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28
Oct
Innovation Dental’s Spooky Halloween Giveaway

AUTHOR Sharise

 

INNOVATION DRIVE DENTAL’S  SPOOKY HALLOWEEN GIVEAWAY

Halloween is just around the corner and we want to see YOUR spooktacular Halloween costumes! The winner of our Halloween contest will win not one, but TWO Sonicare Kids Electric toothbrushes

1) ” Like” our Facebook page: Innovation Drive Dental

2) Share our contest page on your Facebook wall

3) Upload a picture of you in your Halloween costume for one additional entry (optional)

This contest ends Friday November 7th @ 12:00pm (e.s.t). 

To increase your chances, DON’T FORGET TO SHARE OUR FACEBOOK PAGE

Just click on the link https://apps.facebook.com/my-contests/qmfoln

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02
Oct
Welcome Dr. Jaclyn Altman, Periodontist

AUTHOR Sharise

We are happy to announce to you, that we are now offering the services of Dr. Jaclyn Altman , Periodontal Specialist to all of our existing patients. Our goal has always been and continues to be your comfort and convenience.

Therefore, Dr. Altman has agreed to be our onsite Specialist and she will be available to all of our patients for consultations and the treatment of:

  • Periodontal disease
  • Surgical placement of Implants
  • Periodontal Surgery

We have reserved one Thursday a month for Dr. Altman from 1:00 pm to 6:00 pm for your convenience.

If you are in need of any of the above mentioned treatment or are currently seeing someone for any of these conditions, Dr. Altman can see you in the comfort of our office where all of your records are easily accessible.

Should you need more information, please, don’t hesitate to call our office, we will be happy to answer any questions you may have.

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29
Aug
History of Dental Implants

AUTHOR Sharise

While some may consider dental implants “modern day dentistry”, you may be surprised to learn that it dates back to ancient Egyptian times.

In 1952, orthopaedic surgeon Per-Ingvar Brånemark, the father of modern day implantology, was researching bone healing and regeneration at Lund University. During this time, he adopted the rabbit ear chamber (a study that was conducted at the University of Cambridge in which a chamber of titanium was embedded into the soft tissue of the ears of rabbits to study blood flow in vivo) to use in a rabbit’s femur. When he had completed the study, he attempted to remove the titanium chambers from the femur, and noticed that the bone had grown back so close to the titanium that the bone and the chambers were almost fused together.

Although Brånemark had originally planned on using this discovery for hip and knee surgery, he decided that because of the high rate of edentulism (missing teeth) in the general population, he would use this discovery towards the replacement of missing teeth. Today, many dental offices still use Brånemark’s dental implant system.

But hold on a

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14
Aug
What does your tongue reveal about your health?

AUTHOR Sharise

Your tongue can help diagnose general health issues just by looking at it. It’s shape, colour, texture, bumps, and indents can tell you more about your health than you would expect, let’s just say… your tongue is kind of a road map to what is going on in your body.

Tongue Colour

A healthy tongue: pink in colour with a light white coat on it, medium thickness with no cracks, ulcers or teeth marks.

A bright red tongue: A red tongue normally indicates a lack of nutrients in the body, normally Vitamin B and Iron. In children, a strawberry/raspberry coloured tongue can be the early signs of Scarlett fever or Kawasaki disease.

A pale tongue:  You are probabley lacking Haemoglobin, the iron-containing protein found in red blood cells.  A pale tongue can also suggest bacteria, dead cells, and debris are wedged into your papillae. In some cases, a white tongue may be a sign of anemia or oral thrush (yeast infection).

Purple or bluish tongue: This can mean that fluid and blood are not circulating properly.  A purple tongue is common in people who suffer from high cholesterol, heart problems, and chronic bronchitis.

Black and hairy tongues: This is caused by an overgrowth of papillae trapping bacteria and other debris. While this is normally harmless and short lived, it is normally found in

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11
Jun
Medical History Update-Good Communication is Key

AUTHOR Sharise

Make sure your review and update your medical history at every visit.  Tell your dentist about any prescription and over-the-counter drugs you’re taking, any surgeries you have had (especially those involving the heart or joints – artificial knee or hip replacements, for example) and any existing health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or cancer that can affect your oral health.  The medications and conditions for which they’re prescribed can have an impact on the care provided.  You want to make sure that any possible negative interactions are avoided and appropriate precautions are taken before beginning routine dental procedures.  If you have had a hip or knee replacement or have a heart murmur, for example you may need antibiotics before any dental work in order to reduce the risk of infection.

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12
May
10 “Who Knew” Dental Facts

AUTHOR Sharise

1. Flossing can increase your life expectancy. True or False?
True. By flossing daily, you can gain an additional 6 years! How? Poor oral hygiene may lead to inflammatory gum diseases and heart disease. By flossing, we rid our mouths of these disease-causing bacteria.

 

2. What percentage of adults are afraid of the dentist?
More than 80% of adults experience some degree of dental fear. And more than half say this fear may keep them from seeing the dentist

 

3. Chewing gum is bad for your teeth. True or false?
False. Most dentists give gum the thumbs up-as long as it’s sugarless. Chewing gum stimulates saliva flow, which helps protect your teeth against decay-causing bacteria.

 

4. Toothpaste has an expiry date. True or false?
True. Any toothpaste containing fluoride must carry an expiration date and typically it’s two years after the manufacturer date. After this date, fluoride in the toothpaste loses its ability to brush away bacteria in the mouth and protect against cavities.

 

5. What is the hardest substance in the human body?
Enamel, the outer protective layer of your teeth is the hardest substance in the human body.

 

6. It’s OK to keep your toothbrush near the toilet as long as it doesn’t

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16
Apr
Expectant Mothers’ Periodontal Health Vital to Health of Her Baby

AUTHOR Sharise

In the October 2013 issue of Dental Teamwork, an article was written about how a mother’s overall oral health can also affect the health of her baby.

When a woman becomes pregnant, she knows how important it is to maintain a healthy lifestyle to ensure the health of her baby; it is now highly recommended that expectant mothers maintain their periodontal health as well.

Periodontal disease is a chronic, bacteria-induced inflammatory condition that attacked the gum tissue, and in worse cases, the bone supporting the teeth. Tenderness, redness, swollen/bleeding gums are all signs of periodontal disease. These signs, especially during pregnancy, should not be ignored and may require treatment from a dental professional.

Research has indicated that women with periodontal disease may be at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes like low-birth weight and pre-term babies. Babies with a birth weight of less than 5.5lbs may be at risk of long-term health problems such as delayed motor skills, social growth and learning disabilities.  Similar complications are true for babies born 3 weeks before their due date. Because of this, we encourage pregnant women to take care of their oral health with regular dental cleanings during their pregnancy.

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14
Mar
Chewing gum and migraines

AUTHOR Sharise

Chewing gum. Your child’s favourite addiction. Did you know that gum-chewing may be the culprit of your child’s headache/migraine? Dr. Nathan Watemberg of Tel Aviv university-affiliated Meir Medical center published his findings in Pediatric neurology.

While typical triggers of headaches in adolescents are stress, tiredness, heat, video games, noise, sunlight, smoking, missed meals and menstruation, Dr. Watemberg noticed that many patients who reported headaches were daily gum chewers.

For this study, Dr. Watemberg observed 30 patients who had chronic headaches/migraines and chewed gum daily (for at least an hour and up to 6 hours a day). He asked them to stop chewing gum for a month and recorded the results. After a month of not chewing gum, patients reported that their headaches/migraines went away completely or that they experienced a decrease in the frequency and severity of their headaches. To test the results, the participants started chewing gum daily again for 2 weeks. Each of them reported the return of their symptoms within days.

Dr. Watemberg concluded that chewing gum puts stress on the TMJ (the joint where the jaw meets the scull) causing migraines and headaches. He says his findings can be put to use immediately. Doctor’s can advise their patients, teenagers with chronic headaches, to simply

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