Back To School Lunch Ideas

 

We’re heading into our third week of school! Can you believe it? As things start to settle down and routines start to kick in, parents are still often left scrambling for healthy and kid acceptable lunch ideas. Here are some yummy ones that your child will love!

Monday: Turkey and Cheddar Roll Up, Fresh Berries, and Yoghurt

Tuesday: Hummus, Pita Bread, Cherry Tomatoes, Cucumbers and Sliced Oranges

Wednesday: Cheese Quesadilla, Guacamole, Salsa, Tortilla Chips and Slice Strawberries

Thursday: Pasta Salad, Cheese String, Made Good Granola Bars (these are nut free, have veggies hidden in them and they are always a hit), Raspberries

Friday:  Bagel and Cream Cheese, Yoghurt, Baby Carrots and Fruit Snacks

While this is only a sample, it’s super easy and if you are looking for some more great ideas I love to search on Pintrest. If you’re a really creative parent with lots of time on your hands, check out things.my.kids.wont.eat on Instagram. Good luck this school year!

Cavity Culprits

In Today’s Parent January/February 2018 there was an article on cavities in children. Did you know that between 2010 and 2012 almost 30,000 children underwent day surgery to restore decayed teeth? The reason for the day surgery is that most children under the age of 5 cannot sit still in the dental chair for longer periods of time or because of their fear of the dentists. Some parents and professionals think it is easier to have all treatment done at once (while sedated) so that they do not traumatize the child from future dental treatment (like your regular cleanings and check-ups). While there are many factors to the development of childhood caries (like the level of fluoridation in the water, diet, and one’s socioeconomic status), the main cause is that you have the cavity-causing bacteria known as streptococcus mutans/strep mutans in your mouth. We are not born with these bacteria, it is normally passed onto us from a parent through sharing of utensils, food, or when parents may clean their child’s pacifier in their own mouth after it has fallen on the floor. It is best to be mindful and try to avoid doing all of the above. However, once the bacteria have been passed onto the child, please do your best to keep their teeth clean. Remember to brush twice a day, try to floss once a day (especially if their teeth are coming in close together), reduce sugar intake (if they are eating something chewy or sweet, we recommend rinsing with water afterwards). While brushing and flossing may be a difficult task (especially for younger kids) this should be non-negotiable as the outcome of not keep up with oral hygiene could be much worse than your daily fight to get them to do this. The Canadian Dental Association recommends bringing your child for their first visit at 1 year old (or when their teeth have started to erupt). Please contact us at Innovation Drive Dental at 905-264-0333. We would be happy to meet your little ones for their first HAPPY VISIT 😊

This Sensor Helps You Watch What You Eat

Scientists at the Tufts University School of Engineering in Medford, MA have invented a sensor that helps you monitor what you eat. Until recently, the ability to accurately track your daily food intake has been fairly unreliable. This device is a 2mm square that can bond to the surface of your tooth.  At the moment it will only collect information on your salt, glucose and alcohol consumption however they are hoping they will be able to detect a whole array of chemicals and nutrients in the future. They also say that with the ability of picking up chemicals in saliva, they may be able to rate stress levels well.

I haven’t been to the dentist in 10 years. What can I expect?

Wow! Is it 2018 already? Where did the years go? Today we all live very busy lives. The years seem to pass so quickly and we often don’t realize that it may have been 10 years since we last saw a dentist. Although some may have stayed away on purpose, others had every intention to book an appointment but forgot.

Here at Innovation Drive Dental in Woodbridge we welcome all new patients, whether it has been 10 years, 5 years or even 6 months since last seeing a dentist. One of the first things we ask after a patient books a new appointment is how long it has been. The question is not meant to judge, but we know if someone has been away for a while they will often need more time to ask any questions they may have, to discuss the treatment options and often just to feel comfortable in the new setting.

Innovation Dental highly recommends that the first appointment is booked as a New Patient Exam with the doctor. We prefer not to jump into a cleaning right away, for may reasons.  This is an easy and painless appointment as it is purely diagnostic and gives the patient the time to discuss with the doctor any of their concerns. This appointment reintroduces the patient to what dentistry has to offer today with all the modern technology and the knowledge of caring staff and clinicians. A Complete New Patient exam involves:

1.       Introduction and medical history is taken

2.       A pre-op blood pressure measured

3.       A full set of digital x-rays are taken (very low radiation as compared to old style x-rays)

4.       An intra-oral and extra-oral examination is done

5.       An oral cancer screening is done using a Velscope (a special light is shone in your mouth) http://www.velscope.com/velscope-technology/overview/

6.       Charting of the teeth (any existing work you have had done as well as any potential treatment you may need done)

7.       Measurement of bone levels

8.       Intra-oral photos of all the teeth for visual records and future comparison

9.       Discussion and Treatment plan (Q&A)

This appointment can take up to an hour and is very educational and informative. We like to book a cleaning after the New Patient Exam as not all cleanings are the same, and not everyone needs the same cleaning. The Doctors at Innovation Dental feel that treatment should be individualized to the patients needs. If it has only been a few months then you may be ok with one appointment to finish, but some patients may require 2 or more cleaning appointments with freezing (if needed).

If it has been a long time for you, one tip would be to floss a lot before you come in, even if it makes your gums bleed, as this will get them used to being touched below the gum line and may be less uncomfortable at your first cleaning appointment.

At Innovation Dental in Woodbridge we strive to be the dentist you will NOT stay away from or forget to book back with.  We make seeing a dentist or hygienist as enjoyable as a dental visit can be………and those are big shoes to fill……..ask any of our patients! https://www.rateabiz.com/reviews/innovation-drive-dental-woodbridge-on/614cbb39035a2c8916915ab8bc93c688/summary

What Should Be Done When A Tooth Is Knocked Out

The other day we had a patient (who happens to be a teacher) running late for her dental appointment. When she arrived at the office she informed us that one of her students had their tooth knocked out during gym class. She was busy writing up an incident report and that was why she was late. When Dr. Shulman asked what protocol was taken to ensure the life of the tooth, the teacher informed her that no protocol was taken; they were not told what to do when an event like this took place.

So, here it is…

What should be done when a tooth is knocked out (permanent/adult teeth only)?

  • Make sure to handle the tooth carefully. Try to hold the tooth by the crown (the white part), the root (pointy part) of the tooth is soft and can be easily damaged. Try not to touch the root if possible.
  • If the tooth is dirty, try to rinse it with milk (if available) if not, you can use lukewarm water. Do not scrub.
  • Gently rinse mouth and, if possible, try to position the tooth back into the socket (this should be done within 5 minutes) and then bite down on a clean towel/paper towel to put pressure on the tooth and keep in place.
  • If you are unable to get the tooth back in, the tooth should be kept moist. Your best bet is to place the tooth in a cup of milk (if readily available). If there is no access to milk, spit into a cup and let the tooth sit in saliva, or you can place the tooth in your mouth beside your cheek.
  • Go see your dentist immediately (this should be done within an hour of the incident). The tooth can be saved, but time is of the essence. When a tooth is knocked out, the nerves and blood vessels are damaged as well. Because of this, the tooth will require root canal treatment.

What will be done once you have arrived at the dental office?

  • Your dentist will assess the state of your tooth, gums and bone and take an x-ray. Depending on the impact, there is a possibility of bone fracture in your mouth.
  • They will then try to reposition the tooth in the correct place.
  • A root canal may be done immediately, or your dentist may choose to wait depending on what they see.
  • For best result, your dentist will splint your tooth to the neighbouring teeth using a wire and some composite (filling material). This acts like a cast. It holds the tooth in place and prevents unwanted movement so that your bone can start to reattach to the tooth. You will be placed on antibiotics to prevent infection.
  • You dentist will want to monitor the health and progression of this tooth weekly for about 6-8 weeks and then at your regular 6 month check-up.
  • If the tooth is not salvageable your dentist will discuss options to properly replace your missing tooth and get your beautiful smile back ☺

The Facts on Fluoride

 

  • Stops or even reverses decay process (keeps the enamel stay strong by preventing loss of minerals) and reduces sensitivity
  • Can find in drinking water from community water supply, toothpaste, mouthwash, tablets, drops
  • Dentist’s provide rinses, varnishes, gels
  • No scientific evidence that fluoridated water has causes disease or illness
  • Fluoridated toothpaste alone is not enough, that’s why we need other sources
  • Fluoride + children: children under age of 3, guardians should consult dentist prior to using fluoridated toothpaste (over use of fluoride during tooth development can lead to fluorosis)
  • Fluorosis are very faint white spots that appear on the tooth (does not affect the function or health of the tooth, only appearance)
  • Areas of fluorosis are actually more cavity resistant

Fluoride Varnishes

  • Applied only by professionals
  • Agents painted on teeth after cleaning
  • Hardens on tooth and stays on for 4-6 hours then brushed off, releasing fluoride gradually over months
  • Great for children due to less gagging and less swallowed

Fact: healthy gums do NOT bleed

Stress induced oral health conditions

Here are some conditions that can be caused by stress: 

Cold sores and Canker sores

Mostly caused by stress. If the lesion doesn’t heal within a 2-week period, it can be a sign of oral cancer. Call us for an oral cancer screening!

TMD Temporal Mandibular disorder

Most often, TMD is known as clenching or grinding(bruxism). It is usually a subconscious habit occurring during sleep. It results in jaw joint irritation, tooth sensitivity, cracked/bent teeth, wearing teeth, headaches, facial muscle pain, and neck pain. Call us for a consultation for a night guard or other treatment interventions of the worn dentition!

Increased cortisol levels 

This is caused by stress which induces the bodies inflammatory process. Increased inflammation leads to increased gingivitis. Regular/routinely cleanings are important to help reduce infection/inflammation. Book your cleaning appointment today!

Happy Victoria Day!

Wishing all our wonderful Patients a Happy and Safe Victoria Day Long Weekend!

Daily habits that are good for your health but bad for your mouth!

 

We all try to brush our teeth twice a day, and eat healthy foods as often as possible, but somethings that we think are actually good for our health, are not the greatest for our teeth. Here are some examples:

Brushing before you eat

When you eat acidic foods, such as oranges and apples, they tend to soften your enamel. When your enamel is soft and you use something abrasive on them, it will remove some of that enamel and leave your teeth feeling very sensitive. That is why it is recommended to brush your teeth before you eat something acidic, so that your enamel is still strong and won’t be removed.

Chewing on ice

A lot of people like chewing on ice as it is low in calories, and on a hot day, it can cool you off. However, it does have its downsides. Ice is very hard and can cause damage to your teeth, like cracks and chips. It can also cause jaw issues if chewed on for a long period of time. So always be cautious!

Sipping your wine

Some wines tend to have their health benefits, for example red wine. It can help with lowering your cholesterol and heart disease, but it is also acidic. Sipping your wine means more exposure to acid little by little, and this can ruin the enamel on your teeth. Try to mix some water with your wine, one sip of wine, on sip of water, to relieve the amount of acid exposure on your pearly whites.

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month!