What Should Be Done When A Tooth Is Knocked Out

The other day we had a patient (who happens to be a teacher) running late for her dental appointment. When she arrived at the office she informed us that one of her students had their tooth knocked out during gym class. She was busy writing up an incident report and that was why she was late. When Dr. Shulman asked what protocol was taken to ensure the life of the tooth, the teacher informed her that no protocol was taken; they were not told what to do when an event like this took place.

So, here it is…

What should be done when a tooth is knocked out (permanent/adult teeth only)?

  • Make sure to handle the tooth carefully. Try to hold the tooth by the crown (the white part), the root (pointy part) of the tooth is soft and can be easily damaged. Try not to touch the root if possible.
  • If the tooth is dirty, try to rinse it with milk (if available) if not, you can use lukewarm water. Do not scrub.
  • Gently rinse mouth and, if possible, try to position the tooth back into the socket (this should be done within 5 minutes) and then bite down on a clean towel/paper towel to put pressure on the tooth and keep in place.
  • If you are unable to get the tooth back in, the tooth should be kept moist. Your best bet is to place the tooth in a cup of milk (if readily available). If there is no access to milk, spit into a cup and let the tooth sit in saliva, or you can place the tooth in your mouth beside your cheek.
  • Go see your dentist immediately (this should be done within an hour of the incident). The tooth can be saved, but time is of the essence. When a tooth is knocked out, the nerves and blood vessels are damaged as well. Because of this, the tooth will require root canal treatment.

What will be done once you have arrived at the dental office?

  • Your dentist will assess the state of your tooth, gums and bone and take an x-ray. Depending on the impact, there is a possibility of bone fracture in your mouth.
  • They will then try to reposition the tooth in the correct place.
  • A root canal may be done immediately, or your dentist may choose to wait depending on what they see.
  • For best result, your dentist will splint your tooth to the neighbouring teeth using a wire and some composite (filling material). This acts like a cast. It holds the tooth in place and prevents unwanted movement so that your bone can start to reattach to the tooth. You will be placed on antibiotics to prevent infection.
  • You dentist will want to monitor the health and progression of this tooth weekly for about 6-8 weeks and then at your regular 6 month check-up.
  • If the tooth is not salvageable your dentist will discuss options to properly replace your missing tooth and get your beautiful smile back ☺

Chances are you do not have oral cancer, but wouldn’t you like to know for sure? Oral cancer screenings are done at Innovation Dental.

Do these images below look familiar to you? Are you experiencing blisters, noticing unusual lumps or bumps, crust formations or white and red areas on the tongue, lips, gums or other area of the mouth that will not go away? These might all be signs and symptoms of oral cancer. Most non-cancerous lesions resolve within 10-14 days. If they do not resolve, you may need a thorough oral cancer screening examination. At innovation dental drive in Vaughan, we have the latest technology in oral cancer screening called the Velscope. Dr. Corey Shulman and Dr. Jennifer Shulman provide cancer screening as part of every initial examination. Whether you are new to the office or are an existing patient, our dentist and hygienist are always checking for any abnormalities at every visit. These lesions can become life threatening if not diagnosed and treated early. Give us a call today to book your new patient examination and have your oral cancer screening done!

SCREENING AT HOME

Some simple tasks you can add to your daily routine.

  • CHEEKS AND LIPS: Pull back both cheeks and lips and check the tissues for any lumps, bumps, white spots, red spots, cracks and blisters.
  • TONGUE: Stick out your tongue and check for any abnormalities once again. Don’t forget to check underneath the tongue as well. Note: You can use a piece of tissue to help grab hold of your tongue
  • PALATE: Lift your head back and check the roof of your mouth for any abnormalities
  • TONSILS AND THROAT: If you have a tongue depressor, that can aid in detection. Stick your tongue out and firmly press down as far back as you can reach. Look at the tonsils and throat for any abnormalities.

REMEMBER: Preventative measures can be life saving.

WHAT DEFINES NORMAL AND ABNORMAL

Most patients ask the question, what exactly am I looking for? We at Innovation Dental in Woodbridge can help you understand the difference between normal and abnormal tissue.

Normal tissue

Normal areas present itself with uniform, symmetrical tissue pattern. Usually pinkish or brown in colour depending on ethnicity.

Abnormal tissue

Abnormal tissue can appear to be different in colour, either white or red areas. They usually come in irregular patterns, although that may not always be the case. Lumps or bumps can also be a sign. Sometimes they can be asymptomatic or symptomatic, therefore pain can not always be a good indicator. Below are some examples of some abnormal tissue patterns:

THE VELSCOPE

Here at Innovation Dental serving patients throughout Vaughan, Brampton, Woodbridge and Toronto, use the VELscope screening system which uses fluorescence light in order to enhance any abnormalities in the mouth. Below is a visual to help understand the non-invasive screening procedure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Facts on Fluoride

 

  • Stops or even reverses decay process (keeps the enamel stay strong by preventing loss of minerals) and reduces sensitivity
  • Can find in drinking water from community water supply, toothpaste, mouthwash, tablets, drops
  • Dentist’s provide rinses, varnishes, gels
  • No scientific evidence that fluoridated water has causes disease or illness
  • Fluoridated toothpaste alone is not enough, that’s why we need other sources
  • Fluoride + children: children under age of 3, guardians should consult dentist prior to using fluoridated toothpaste (over use of fluoride during tooth development can lead to fluorosis)
  • Fluorosis are very faint white spots that appear on the tooth (does not affect the function or health of the tooth, only appearance)
  • Areas of fluorosis are actually more cavity resistant

Fluoride Varnishes

  • Applied only by professionals
  • Agents painted on teeth after cleaning
  • Hardens on tooth and stays on for 4-6 hours then brushed off, releasing fluoride gradually over months
  • Great for children due to less gagging and less swallowed

Fact: healthy gums do NOT bleed

Stress induced oral health conditions

Here are some conditions that can be caused by stress: 

Cold sores and Canker sores

Mostly caused by stress. If the lesion doesn’t heal within a 2-week period, it can be a sign of oral cancer. Call us for an oral cancer screening!

TMD Temporal Mandibular disorder

Most often, TMD is known as clenching or grinding(bruxism). It is usually a subconscious habit occurring during sleep. It results in jaw joint irritation, tooth sensitivity, cracked/bent teeth, wearing teeth, headaches, facial muscle pain, and neck pain. Call us for a consultation for a night guard or other treatment interventions of the worn dentition!

Increased cortisol levels 

This is caused by stress which induces the bodies inflammatory process. Increased inflammation leads to increased gingivitis. Regular/routinely cleanings are important to help reduce infection/inflammation. Book your cleaning appointment today!

Happy Victoria Day!

Wishing all our wonderful Patients a Happy and Safe Victoria Day Long Weekend!

Daily habits that are good for your health but bad for your mouth!

 

We all try to brush our teeth twice a day, and eat healthy foods as often as possible, but somethings that we think are actually good for our health, are not the greatest for our teeth. Here are some examples:

Brushing before you eat

When you eat acidic foods, such as oranges and apples, they tend to soften your enamel. When your enamel is soft and you use something abrasive on them, it will remove some of that enamel and leave your teeth feeling very sensitive. That is why it is recommended to brush your teeth before you eat something acidic, so that your enamel is still strong and won’t be removed.

Chewing on ice

A lot of people like chewing on ice as it is low in calories, and on a hot day, it can cool you off. However, it does have its downsides. Ice is very hard and can cause damage to your teeth, like cracks and chips. It can also cause jaw issues if chewed on for a long period of time. So always be cautious!

Sipping your wine

Some wines tend to have their health benefits, for example red wine. It can help with lowering your cholesterol and heart disease, but it is also acidic. Sipping your wine means more exposure to acid little by little, and this can ruin the enamel on your teeth. Try to mix some water with your wine, one sip of wine, on sip of water, to relieve the amount of acid exposure on your pearly whites.

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month!

Tuesday giggles!!

Acid Erosion Chart

Scared of the dentist? Ways to help with Dental anxiety!

When you think of going to the dentist, do you feel your heart start racing? Do you get nervous of sitting in the chair and having those sharp instruments in your mouth? Well, you are not alone when it comes to this! Studies show that 1 in 4 people have fears of going to the dentist. But there are ways to help you get over these issues.

Some people have developed these problems due to past experiences, and some are scared of the dentist because they are nervous about feeling pain. With the dental industry advancing all the time, there are many ways that sedation and anesthetics can help stop these fears.

There are a few ways to help with handling your fear of the dentist. One of them would be to come in and meet with the doctor to talk about your issues. They can go over the procedures that need to be done and talk about your anxiety and ways to treat it. They can also offer ways to keep you calm, such as a blanket or pillow during your appointment, or music to listen too.

Another way to help with your anxiety is to talk to your friends or family. Sometimes getting advice from the people closest to you can help manage your fear, and sharing their good experiences with you can make it a little easier to go to the dentist.