The Facts on Fluoride

 

  • Stops or even reverses decay process (keeps the enamel stay strong by preventing loss of minerals) and reduces sensitivity
  • Can find in drinking water from community water supply, toothpaste, mouthwash, tablets, drops
  • Dentist’s provide rinses, varnishes, gels
  • No scientific evidence that fluoridated water has causes disease or illness
  • Fluoridated toothpaste alone is not enough, that’s why we need other sources
  • Fluoride + children: children under age of 3, guardians should consult dentist prior to using fluoridated toothpaste (over use of fluoride during tooth development can lead to fluorosis)
  • Fluorosis are very faint white spots that appear on the tooth (does not affect the function or health of the tooth, only appearance)
  • Areas of fluorosis are actually more cavity resistant

Fluoride Varnishes

  • Applied only by professionals
  • Agents painted on teeth after cleaning
  • Hardens on tooth and stays on for 4-6 hours then brushed off, releasing fluoride gradually over months
  • Great for children due to less gagging and less swallowed

Fact: healthy gums do NOT bleed

Stress induced oral health conditions

Here are some conditions that can be caused by stress: 

Cold sores and Canker sores

Mostly caused by stress. If the lesion doesn’t heal within a 2-week period, it can be a sign of oral cancer. Call us for an oral cancer screening!

TMD Temporal Mandibular disorder

Most often, TMD is known as clenching or grinding(bruxism). It is usually a subconscious habit occurring during sleep. It results in jaw joint irritation, tooth sensitivity, cracked/bent teeth, wearing teeth, headaches, facial muscle pain, and neck pain. Call us for a consultation for a night guard or other treatment interventions of the worn dentition!

Increased cortisol levels 

This is caused by stress which induces the bodies inflammatory process. Increased inflammation leads to increased gingivitis. Regular/routinely cleanings are important to help reduce infection/inflammation. Book your cleaning appointment today!

Happy Victoria Day!

Wishing all our wonderful Patients a Happy and Safe Victoria Day Long Weekend!

Daily habits that are good for your health but bad for your mouth!

 

We all try to brush our teeth twice a day, and eat healthy foods as often as possible, but somethings that we think are actually good for our health, are not the greatest for our teeth. Here are some examples:

Brushing before you eat

When you eat acidic foods, such as oranges and apples, they tend to soften your enamel. When your enamel is soft and you use something abrasive on them, it will remove some of that enamel and leave your teeth feeling very sensitive. That is why it is recommended to brush your teeth before you eat something acidic, so that your enamel is still strong and won’t be removed.

Chewing on ice

A lot of people like chewing on ice as it is low in calories, and on a hot day, it can cool you off. However, it does have its downsides. Ice is very hard and can cause damage to your teeth, like cracks and chips. It can also cause jaw issues if chewed on for a long period of time. So always be cautious!

Sipping your wine

Some wines tend to have their health benefits, for example red wine. It can help with lowering your cholesterol and heart disease, but it is also acidic. Sipping your wine means more exposure to acid little by little, and this can ruin the enamel on your teeth. Try to mix some water with your wine, one sip of wine, on sip of water, to relieve the amount of acid exposure on your pearly whites.

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month!

Tuesday giggles!!

Acid Erosion Chart

Scared of the dentist? Ways to help with Dental anxiety!

When you think of going to the dentist, do you feel your heart start racing? Do you get nervous of sitting in the chair and having those sharp instruments in your mouth? Well, you are not alone when it comes to this! Studies show that 1 in 4 people have fears of going to the dentist. But there are ways to help you get over these issues.

Some people have developed these problems due to past experiences, and some are scared of the dentist because they are nervous about feeling pain. With the dental industry advancing all the time, there are many ways that sedation and anesthetics can help stop these fears.

There are a few ways to help with handling your fear of the dentist. One of them would be to come in and meet with the doctor to talk about your issues. They can go over the procedures that need to be done and talk about your anxiety and ways to treat it. They can also offer ways to keep you calm, such as a blanket or pillow during your appointment, or music to listen too.

Another way to help with your anxiety is to talk to your friends or family. Sometimes getting advice from the people closest to you can help manage your fear, and sharing their good experiences with you can make it a little easier to go to the dentist.

How To Floss

floss

The proper flossing technique, according to the Canadian Dental Association, begins with a piece of floss the length of a person’s hand to their shoulder. The floss should be wound around the index and middle finger with about two inches of space between. Each tooth should be cleaned by wrapping the floss in a C-shape around the base of the tooth and sliding the floss from base to tip two or three times. If you have braces, follow the same guideline but use a floss threader to get the floss through your braces 🙂

Teeth should be brushed after flossing, according to the guidelines.

Bleeding is a common side effect when a person begins flossing, but it should stop after a few days. If it does not stop, the Canadian Dental Association recommends visiting a dentist.

April is National Oral Health Month

Although the mouth is part of the body, we often think of it as something separate. We often ignore bleeding or tender gums, while an irritation or pain elsewhere in the body would mean a trip to the doctor.

Poor oral health can affect a person’s quality of life. Oral pain, missing teeth or oral infections can influence the way a person speaks, eats and socializes. These oral health problems can reduce a person’s quality of life by affecting their physical, mental and social well-being.

The reality is that oral health problems could be a sign of something serious such as oral cancer. Every year approximately 3,200 Canadians are diagnosed with oral cancer and 1,050 deaths from oral cancer occur. This devastating disease has a low survival rate because it is often diagnosed very late. With early detection the survival rate of oral cancer can be greatly improved. This means going to your dentist for regular dental exams. Your dentist has the training and experience to detect oral cancer early.

Everything that happens in your mouth affects your whole body, which is why it is so important to visit your dentist regularly. Only your dentist has the training, skills and expertise to properly address all your oral health care needs. Regular dental exams help prevent small problems from getting worse.

Go to http://www.cda-adc.ca/en/oral_health/cfyt/good_for_life/default.asp for the Canadian Dental Associations 5 steps for good oral health!